Medical and Senior Advisors

Joseph Brain, M.S., Sc.D.

Dr. Brain received his Master of Science and Doctor of Science degrees from Harvard University. He is the Cecil K. and Philip Drinker Professor of Environmental Physiology at Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Brain’s research emphasizes responses to inhaled gases, particulates, and microbes. His studies extend from the deposition of inhaled particles in the respiratory tract to their clearance by respiratory defense mechanisms. Of particular interest is the role of lung macrophages; this resident cell keeps lung surfaces clean and sterile. The context of these studies on macrophages is the prevention and pathogenesis of environmental lung disease as well as respiratory infection. Dr. Brain’s research has utilized magnetic particles in macrophages throughout the body as a non-invasive tool for measuring cell motility and the response of macrophages to various mediators and toxins. Another area of study is drug delivery to and through the lungs.

Molly Coye, M.D., M.P.H.

Dr. Coye is an internationally renowned authority on the market introduction of innovative technologies that impact health care delivery. She is currently the chief innovation officer of UCLA Health, and serves as a director for Aetna Inc. and Prosetta Biosciences Inc. Over the past decade, Dr. Coye has amassed a stellar record of achievement as a pioneer in the development, assessment and diffusion of health-related technology. She founded and served as CEO of the Health Technology Center, a preeminent forecaster of the impact of emerging technologies. Dr. Coye co-founded and served as chair of the board of directors and CEO of CalRHIO, California’s first statewide health information exchange organization. She is a member of the prestigious Institute of Medicine and co-authored two landmark Institute reports on healthcare quality. Dr. Coye received her M.D. and M.P.H. degrees from Johns Hopkins University and is board certified by the American College of Preventive Medicine.

David Greatorex AO, BA (Hons), MComm, FCA

David has been chairman of many companies, including IBM New Zealand and the State Bank of New South Wales (Australia’s fifth largest bank). He has also been a director of various companies. For over 25 years, David has supported more than 50 startups – two of them have been unicorns. He and Peter Farrell formed a $2 company, which became ResMed. The other is an Australian network security company in which he chaired and was a major shareholder. It went from an IPO of $12 million in two and a half years to $1.3 billion market cap. At IBM, David was responsible for installing the first two commercial computers in Australia and has retained a strong continuing interest in the IT sector. His other main interest is biotech where he is currently involved in six startups. David has spent 15 years as a visiting professor at two universities, teaching strategy.

Nicholas Hill, M.D.

Dr. Hill is a professor of medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine, and chief of the Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Division at Tufts Medical Center. He also oversees pulmonary hypertension clinics in Boston and in Providence at Rhode Island Hospital. Dr. Hill’s primary research interests include the role of angiogenic factors in pulmonary vascular biology, therapeutic approaches for clinical pulmonary hypertension, and evaluating ways of delivering and testing the efficacy of noninvasive ventilation. He has authored or coauthored more than 100 articles in peer-reviewed journals such as American Journal of Physiology, Respiratory Medicine, and Critical Care Medicine. Dr. Hill is the immediate post-chair of the program committee of the critical care assembly of the American Thoracic Society. He holds a Distinguished Scholar Award from the American College of Chest Physicians. Dr. Hill is an associate editor of the journal Chest and serves on the editorial board of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

David Hillman, M.D.

Dr. Hillman is head of the Department of Pulmonary Physiology and Sleep Medicine at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital in Perth, Western Australia, and director of the West Australian Sleep Disorders Research Institute. He is an anesthesiologist and sleep physician. Dr. Hillman’s clinical and research interests are centered on respiratory and upper airway physiology and their relationship to sleep disorders and anesthesia. He has published extensively in related areas. Dr. Hillman is a clinical professor at the University of Western Australia, immediate past president of the Australasian Sleep Association, and founding chair of Australia’s Sleep Health Foundation.

Jon-Erik Holty, M.D., M.S.

Dr. Holty is currently a clinical assistant professor (affiliated) in the Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Division at Stanford Medical School, and an adjunct associate at the Center for Health Policy (CHP/PCOR) at Stanford. He joined CHP/PCOR in July 2002 to participate in the VA’s Ambulatory Care Practice and Research fellowship program. Dr. Holty completed his master’s degree in health research and policy at Stanford in 2005 and subsequently completed clinical fellowships at Stanford in pulmonary critical care and sleep medicine. His current research focuses on healthcare utilization and costs in veterans with sleep complaints, disturbance and disorders. Dr. Holty received a bachelor’s degree in biochemistry and political science from UCLA, an M.D. from Columbia University, a master’s degree in health services research from Stanford, and completed an internal medicine residency, a pulmonary critical care fellowship and sleep medicine fellowship at Stanford.

Jerrold Alan Kram, M.D., FCCP, FAASM

Dr. Kram is the medical director of the California Center for Sleep Disorders (CCSD), and is one of the country’s most experienced sleep specialists. He began his work in the field in 1980, opened CCSD in 1983 and received his board certification in sleep medicine in 1989. Dr. Kram graduated with honors from the New York University School of Medicine and completed his internal medicine residency and pulmonary fellowship at University of California, San Francisco. He is actively engaged in programs to spread sleep expertise throughout the local medical community and is a featured speaker in professional and community lectures nationwide. Dr. Kram currently serves on the board of the National Sleep Foundation. He works with the American College of Chest Physicians and American Academy of Family Practice to develop a curriculum teaching sleep medicine to primary care physicians.

Mary Morrell, Ph.D.

Dr. Morrell is a professor of sleep and respiratory physiology at the National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London. She received her doctorate in physiology from London University, having previously trained and practiced as a nurse at St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington. As a student in the department of respiratory medicine at Charing Cross Hospital, Dr. Morrell developed an interest in the control of breathing during sleep, which continues to drive her research. She was awarded a Wellcome Trust Prize International Travelling Research Fellowship that allowed her to post-doc at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Upon her return to the UK, Dr. Morrell collaborated with clinical colleagues to set up the Academic Unit of Sleep and Breathing, at the Royal Brompton Hospital. She has received career development and university fellowships from the Wellcome Trust; funding from the British Heart Foundation and the NIHR.

Deborah Schueren

Deborah has more than 25 years of experience working with innovative and growing companies in the medical technology and pharmaceutical/biotech sectors. Since 2001, she has served as CFO, board member, board advisor and consultant for multiple private companies, raising venture funding, leading strategic and financial planning and negotiating technology and product collaborations. Prior to 2001, Deborah worked in a variety of financial and corporate development positions in biotech, ultimately as CFO, CEO and board member. Earlier in her career, she was a consultant with The Boston Consulting Group and worked in corporate finance with Lehman Brothers investment banking division. Deborah holds a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from Texas A&M University and an MBA from Harvard Business School.

Kingman Strohl, M.D.

Dr. Strohl is the research director for sleep medicine at UH Case Medical Center and is a professor of medicine, physiology and biophysics at the Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) School of Medicine. His distinguished career has spanned 35 years at CWRU where he has been a major contributor in educational and academic committees and a productive collaborator in the promotion of excellence in clinical training in pulmonary and sleep medicine. Dr. Strohl’s most prominent recognition comes through his research, publications and presentations on mechanisms for sleep apnea. His achievements include editorial responsibility for a number of journals and publications, designing data analysis software and participating in national task forces on sleep apnea, sleepiness, and driving risk. Dr. Strohl is currently involved in research on the genetics of respiratory control, pharmacologic modification of central apneas, the effect of early life on brain development, and sleep education.

Colin Sullivan, M.B.B.S., Ph.D, FRACP *

Professor Sullivan is recognized as an international leader in the field of sleep disordered breathing. His major research achievements include characterizing the basic physiology of breathing during sleep and the recognition that arousal responses from sleep are crucial to survival in respiratory failure. Professor Sullivan has been the key person in Australia promoting the investigation of sleep disorders medicine and he established the first diagnostic sleep laboratories for adults and children. He is known internationally for developing nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to treat obstructive sleep apnea. This is now the most widely used treatment for this disease throughout the world.

J. Woodrow Weiss, M.D.

Dr. Weiss is the chief of the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and is a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. He is also the founder of the Harvard Medical School Division of Sleep Medicine and he remains a member of that Division’s Executive Committee. Dr. Weiss is active clinically on the Medical Intensive Care Service at Beth Israel Deaconess. His research focuses on the cardio-respiratory consequences of intermittent hypoxia and arterial pressure control in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The laboratory uses human volunteers to examine causes of susceptibility to sleep apnea of cyclic intermittent hypoxia induced hypertension, and the laboratory uses animal models to study molecular pathways contributing to sustained chemoreflex hypersensitivity and its contribution to elevated arterial pressure after cyclic intermittent hypoxia.